Posts in Press Freedom
Kashmiris worry about their future as Indian government relaxes lockdown

As the Indian government’s communication ban reaches two weeks, it announced that 50,000 landline connections have been restored for calls after crowds surged last week to the few phones available from government offices. Internet and mobile networks remain shut.

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The real story of America's bloody struggle for religious freedom

We talked with Steven Waldman, founder of BeliefNet and author of the new book Sacred Liberty, about America’s battles for religious freedom— how the notion that the US was founded with religious liberty in mind is wrong— our current challenges for preserving it, and much more.

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Mainstream press continues to ignore French church vandalism incidents

(COMMENTARY) A month after the Notre Dame blaze, there continues to be little to no coverage when it comes to the rash of suspicious fires and vandalism that plagued French churches in the weeks before the Paris incident, which was quickly deemed unintentional by Parisian authorities.

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Kenyan media calls New York Times racist for images of terror attack

(NEWS ANALYSIS) The Media Council of Kenya, the sector's regulator in the country, is demanding that the New York Times take down a graphic photo of a terrorist attack in Nairobi, threatening to withdraw accreditation of its journalists working in Kenya.

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Prayers for Venezuela: Faith and famine in the ongoing economic crisis

Every day, state control intensifies at every level. All forms of demonstrations are prohibited. Cities across Venezuela have become militarized zones littered with heavily-armed soldiers and tanks. My friends, who are also journalists, have been fired from reporting the truth.

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As European blasphemy laws endure, journalists should consider how words can get them in trouble

(COMMENTARY) This is an issue journalists — whether they’re writing opinion/analysis pieces or constructing hard news stories — should stay tuned into to avoid crossing the wrong side of a shifting line.

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A Christian’s acquittal in Pakistan is fueling advocacy against "blasphemy"

After the unprecedented acquittal of a Christian from blasphemy charges, Pakistan is bowing to pressure from hardline Islamist groups to ban her exit from the Muslim-majority country.

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The Death of Free Speech in Europe

(COMMENTARY) Europe took a dystopian turn last week when the European Court of Human Rights ruled that governments can punish citizens for criticizing the prophet Muhammad if such criticism “conflicts with the right of others to have their religious feelings protected.”

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The Media Project's 2018 Coaching & Leadership Fellows

TMP’s flagship Coaching & Leadership Fellowship program just wrapped up in St. Petersburg, Fla., where we hosted a week-long workshop Oct. 7-13 at the Poynter Institute. Fellows participated in a series of interactive sessions on leadership principles they can use in their newsrooms. strategic thinking, global fact-checking, social media, coaching writers, using feedback, resolving conflict, and improving newsroom collaboration.

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Journalists feel the heat as Kenya ramps up fight against corruption, President Kenyatta seeks divine intervention

The Kenyan media is fighting back against politicians who are determined to restrict them from exposing corrupt deals. This comes after President Uhuru Kenyatta approached the church seeking divine intervention and comfort after he lost friends who were unhappy with his stance against theft of public land.

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The Archbishop of Delhi's Call for Prayer

Why has a letter by the Archbishop of Delhi to all the Parish priests and religious institutions in the Archdiocese of Delhi with the subject ‘Prayer for our nation’ created a firestorm in India? The media suddenly is abuzz after several different voices across the political spectrum cry foul that the letter is meant to divide the nation on communal lines. Notably, the right wing Hindu organization’s ideologue called it a "direct attack on secularism and democracy."

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The State of Journalism in Argentina

Since the beginning of the Internet, traditional media has tried to adapt to new technologies and business models. Newspaper sales are declining and online media adds pressure as they compete for reader’s attention. Journalism in Argentina is now facing economic crisis. Our biggest newspapers, La Nación and Clarín, are reducing their staff while others close their doors. This is not only a newspaper problem, it is known that radio & TV stations are firing journalists, as well.

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Ten Ethics Lessons from the #MeToo Movement in Media -- and Beyond

It is a time of reckoning in the media industry. Breakthrough reporting revealed that newsroom sexual misconduct is both pervasive and protected. That truth became the catalyst for the #MeToo moment, which opened eyes by opening old -- and not-so-old wounds for all to witness. How did it happen here? How did our systems and values harbor harassment and discrimination?

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